CADA

Welcome

Bienvenue

home sep members sep news sep gallery sep links sep benefits sep contacts

News From CADA

CADA Online Antique Show

2017-09-19

The Canadian Antique Dealers Association, in celebration of Canada's 150th Birthday and the 375th Anniversary of the founding of Montreal, is hosting an Online Show that will feature our dealers' finest antiques, including many items that have a connection with our great country.

The show is entirely online and will commence on Monday October 16th, 2017 and will run until Midnight, Monday October 23, 2017, with previews starting on October 13.

Dealer information will be provided with each item for sale and contact information will be provided for each dealer, either by phone, text messaging, or email.

The Canadian Antique Dealers Association includes Canada's finest dealers, offering a wide variety of antiques and decorative items from early Georgian furniture to rare 20th century one of a kind items. We are very hopeful that you will find our selection of antiques and decorative items interesting and desirable. All have been carefully chosen and represent exceptional quality and of course, are backed by CADA's guarantee of authenticity.

You can find the online show at cadaantiqueshow.com



Canada, and Canadiana, thoughtfully presented

2017-09-19

CELEBRATING CANADA

Decorating with History in a Contemporary Home

Peter E. Baker
Dundurn Press
240 Pages
Hardback ISBN 978-1-45974-032-7
$65 CDN
ePub ISBN 1-45974-025-4
$34.99

It's a thrill to review an actual Canadian book on antiques, art and decorative pieces. Given the many American books on antiques that grace From the Shelf, you recognize that the volume of titles coming out of Canada is relatively meager. That alone makes this one special. It's Canadian.

Full disclosure: the author, Peter Baker, has become a personal friend. A well-known Québec dealer for more than 40 years, and an appraiser of Canadiana on both the Canadian and BBC Antique Roadshow programs, he is also a long-time advertiser here at the magazine. So you might think the fix is in!

Just one look at this fresh new book – it comes out in June – will immediately dispel that thought from your mind.

What you notice first is the stylish design. Befitting a book with the subtitle Decorating with History in a Contemporary Home, the clean look is easy to read, mating text with large photographs that show solid detail across furniture, folk art, fine art, and decorative objects. The look's not minimalist, yet it leans toward 'less is more' – a nod to today's pervasive decorating style in a way that should attract a design/decorating crowd well beyond those of us who already collect Canadiana. Yet, the subtitle is a bit misleading: the book is about much more than decorating with antiques. You'll find the pieces explained in deep detail. You'll be both educated and entertained.

And those photographs! Expertly taken by Marc Bider, there is no compromise on quality even though most were shot in-situ. It would be easy to gush over the images, but I know you will do that yourself when you see the book.

But what is it truly about? Here's an excerpt from John A. Fleming's Foreword.

In the table of contents for this new book, Peter Baker, collector, appraisal expert, long-time dealer and enthusiast, proposes a broad array of objects, historical events, anecdotes, and stories, in a call to the celebration of Canada's 150th birthday, through a fresh and amusing opening into the material history of our country and the discovery of its hidden potential for renewal. In the role of objects as active players in our everyday lives, these are the only real “events” of the past that survive in direct material form to awaken and expose the thick textures of experience, cultural environs, and our identity in the present.

Choosing a room-by-room path through the house of avid collectors Joan and Derek Burney, Baker has borrowed an appropriate procedure from historical inventory practices in Quebec, in order to establish a coherent domestic geography to guide the reader into the spaces and corners of the furnishings, accessories, and material constituents that recall to us our own environments. The concept of a single collection, anchored in the passage of more than 300 years of common history in all its material diversity, reclaims the years and objects represented here, exceptionally focused, and repurposed in delightful and surprising ways.

And the pieces you'll see? I'll let Baker speak from the book.

Like many of my fellow dealers, I am often asked to explain what makes something great. If it is a question related to best form, then the answer can be logically deduced, but if we are speaking about a one-of-a-kind object, then it is a much more difficult question to answer. Sometimes it is a connection to history; sometimes simply age and rarity; sometimes it is the beauty of form, decoration or precision construction. Great objects always stand out regardless of the viewer's background, taste or education.

With objects spanning three centuries of Canadian history, from the early days of French settlement to the creative boom of late 20th-century folk artists, you'll see “great.”

Chatting with Baker at the recent Bowmanville Antique Show, he mentioned another motivation, “…to also help the trade, and to help attract a new audience for Canadiana.” Now I understand the first paragraph of his Introduction:

This is a book about living with “soul”, about giving a contemporary home a unique identity in a time when immediate fulfillment and peer acceptance pervade social media and where history is frequently viewed as something best left to academics and the stuffy living rooms of elderly relatives.

Inspired by the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017 — the same year recognizing 375 years of settlement in Montreal — the goal is to renew awareness towards the material history that surrounds us no matter where we may live in Canada. In these pages we show how antiques and folk art can work with a modern lifestyle, imparting an ambience impossible to achieve with the furniture and decorative accessories available at the nearest big box store.

I could go on. I won't. Just get the book. Whether you're a committed collector of Canadiana, or a seeker new to the passion and looking to learn, or someone wanting to understand how to achieve “the look” in a condo or a house, you'll not be disappointed.

By J. Herbert Bond
Canadian Antiques & Vintage magazine



CADA offers a positive perspective

2012-07-25

EDITOR: Adrian Tinline's column in the last Upper Canadian certainly struck a chord for every CADA member. Mr. Tinline's concerns are without doubt the main factor itn the formation of The Canadian Antique Dealers Association back in 1967. CADA realized then that to insure that there was a segment of the market that sold only articles essentially unchanged and at least 100 years old would be the main thrust of the Association.

This qualification of 100 years guaranteed that a purchaser's investment would have the ability to appreciate in time. Coupled with that, is the assurance that the dealer has been vetted by a committee from the Association and that the dealer's knowledge is up to the high standard of the Association. These tenets of CADA have remained unchanged since its inception in 1967.

The Association was a coming together of many professional antique dealers in many different areas of expertise such as; china, silver, Candiana, English and Continental, etc. An applicant to CADA had to operate out of a retail premises and the stock had to be pre-1867, at least 100 years old in 1967. Prospective dealers had to be vetted, demonstrate expertise in their chosen area(s) of specialization, be dedicated to fair dealing and committed to educating the public about antiques. This has not changed and of course, we welcome dealers young and old to join.

As for Mr. Tinline's assertion that CADA has lost its chosen policy of “any dealer who subscribes and lives up to the code should be admitted”, well, that simply is untrue. CADA's charter is essentially the same as in 1967, the qualifications for admittance are still the sam. What has changed is the requirement that stock must be pre-1867; now it is 75% at least 100 years old with the remaining 25% of unusual interest. The original requirement that a dealer must have at least five years experience as a dealer has been changed to three. Finally, a dealer may now operate from home, an office or antique shows. We now offer special consideration to dealersthat specialize in Art Nouveau, Deco and Edwardian period antiques.

CADA's main objective is still our “code of ethics” (available on the CADA website). We welcome anyone who agrees to be bound by the “code” and allows his business to be scrutinized by a vetting committee of CADA members.

Today CADA is as relevant as it was in 1967. We welcome the next generation of great, knowledgeable dealers who will carry us forth into future generations.

Robert (Bob) Starr, President, Fred Rizner, Vice President

GENTLEMEN: It's wonderful to have CADA weigh in, and bring their considerable weight to the discussion. Your steadfastness over four-and-one-half decades adds solidity to the antiques trade, to the benefit of both dealers and collectors. Your fair and measured thoughts above are sincerely appreciated, and we're pleased to be able to share them.

ED.

With approval of The Upper Canadian Antique Showcase. V32 no4.



CADA Gets a New Online Look

2010-12-09

Toronto

It's all change at cadainfo.com as the Canadian Antique Dealers Association gets a new look. It's out with the old and in with the new as a general 'sprucing-up' of the web-site turned into a wholesale re-design.

'The old site was really starting to show its age and, compared with many dealers' sites, just was no longer up to scratch,' said John Ellin of J Taylor Antiques, who led the re-design effort.

Feel free to take a look around and let us know what you think at info@cadainfo.com..



Stolen

These articles have been reported as stolen by the relevant authorities. If you are offered these items for sale, Please contact them directly.


qc1108.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1107.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1106.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1105.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1104.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1103.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1102.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

qc1101.png

Sûreté du Québec

1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7

Contact

Contact: Sergent Jean-François Talbot/Sergent Alain Dumouchel/Gendarme Sylvie Dubuc (Gendarmerie Royale du Canada)
Address: 1701 rue Parthenais, bureau 1.07, Montréal, Québec H2K 3S7
Phone: 514-598-4134
Fax: 514-596-3570
E-mail: art.alerte@surete.qc.ca
Emergency: 514-247-4318
Case/Dossier: 13-105
This file regards the eight (8) stolen work of Arts of Johannes Sadeler. Those prints show biblical scenes of landscapes.

Fairs & Exhibitions Calendar

Note

This information is provided as a courtesy. The Canadian Antique Dealers Association is in no way liable for inaccurate information.
Your Privacy | Copyright
Valid XHTML 1.0   Valid CSS